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What does brexit mean for british buyers?

Can I still buy a property in Spain?

Yes. Britain is still a member of the EU and British citizens enjoy the same rights today that they did last week.

It is likely to take at least two years to leave the EU, and many more years to settle the resulting changes in trade agreements. British buyers are unlikely to feel the impact for some years.

What does a fall in sterling mean?

The exchange rate is expected to be volatile over the coming months, but buyers can take steps to insulate themselves from currency risk. We strongly recommend considering using one of the leading currency exchange companies who have experts on hand to ensure you get the best deal.

It is also worth setting this in a wider context: While Spanish property prices have been steadily recovering over the past 2 years, they remain 32% cheaper than their peak in 2007.

Spanish property remains excellent value.

What will happen to my property when the UK leaves?

Spain has a long history of welcoming buyers from overseas, who now account for 1 in 5 house sales. Non-EU buyers are extremely active in the market and enjoy very similar rights to EU nationals.

Leaving the EU/EEA is highly unlikely to impact the rights of British citizens to buy property in Spain. Overseas investment is too important to the economy.

Will the Spanish property market crash?

British buyers are important to the Spanish market and they are the largest single nationality among overseas investors. However to put this in context, Brits form 4% of the market.

There are two reasons Brexit is highly unlikely to trigger a crash. Firstly, foreign buyers are a diverse group: German, French, Belgian, Italian and Swedish (among many others) are all an extremely active, growing part of the market.

There may be some localised pain, but even a complete collapse in UK demand (again, totally unlikely) would only put a small dent in the market.

Secondly, the market has nowhere to go. Spanish property has been recovering steadily since 2014, but remains a very long way off its peak. The worst we expect from Brexit is restrained growth.